Newsletter #10
January, 2004

Published by: Ed Schmidt
7307 Lindbergh Dr.  
St. Louis, MO 63117
314-647-1608
to send Ed email, click here:
eschmidt1@mindspring.com

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Sources
Feature articles, book reviews, and other items appearing in the newsletter come from you, our members. Such items should be sent to the above address.
This issue contains diary excerpts of Julia Dickinson, daughter of Ann Russell Dickinson, from her recent teaching experience in Jinja, Uganda. Has your love of Africa washed off on one of your daughters or sons? If so, why not encourage them to submit something for the newsletter? If the response is sufficient, we can devote an entire issue to the writings of our offspring!
Newsletter Matters
A big "thank you" to all who sent a financial contribution after the last newsletter. Second round contributions are now in order. If you haven't sent yours yet, please consider doing so at this time. We got 4 years (8 issues) from first round contributions -- let's do the same on round two! Checks should be made out to "Ed Schmidt."
Please, please, please, let the editor know when your contact information changes. We are losing contact with too many people who change email address or move. Make it your responsibility to keep this information current with TEAA.
Webwork
Send any material for the website, or suggested improvements, to TEAA webmaster Henry Hamburger, by clicking on his email address here: henryh@cs.gmu.edu.
The website has some new links to help you find current material. Thus in Brooks Goddard's Message from the Chair (which you can click here), where Brooks urges folks to contact a member of the `Steering Committee,' the latter phrase is now clickable and takes you to the page where the current officers are listed. When you get to that page, you can click the name of any officer to get into an email session composing a message to that person. Past issues of the newsletter, and much more, can also be found on the website.
In This Issue
Note: Underlined `Contents' items are clickable.

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Emergency Education in Africa
Barry Sesnan
[Barry Sesnan's contact information is: P O Box 156, Entebbe, Uganda,. At the present time he is head of the UNDP sub-office in Bunia, Eastern Congo. He was TEA UK 68-69, then, went on to Shimo la Tewa SS, Mombasa 69-70; Homa Bay SS, Homa Bay, 70-71, and St Mary's, Yala HS Kenya, 71-74.]
When we hear of a disaster or a flow of refugees somewhere, our first instinct when thinking of assistance is naturally directed towards providing food, water (and sanitation), shelter and medical care. The whole package of aid given by, say UNHCR or the Red Cross, will make sure that these main elements are provided. In many cases, protection is also an important issue, with an emphasis on protecting children and women.
Education is not normally considered in the first few days, but, if the crisis or displacement looks like lasting, it does not take long before children, their parents and relief officials conclude that "something" must be done with the children and youth. This "something" can range from a simple safe space which serves as a child-minding facility to a full substitute for the formal education system, with skills training, and "catch-up" or remedial education being important especially for youth. Providing the "something" is what education in emergencies is about.
Emergency education scenarios. In almost all these scenarios, overcrowding, lack of qualified teachers, lack of books, and lack of purpose-built buildings all play a role. In many countries which once had a qualified teaching force many of the teachers have died already of AIDS. When resources are scarce, hard choices have to be made, between books, buildings, school feeding, training untrained people to be teachers. Normally, we have to start with the teachers, who may be unpaid volunteers.
Refugees and displaced people. Being a refugee may involve total disconnection from the original education system. Choices may have to be made about language to be used, syllabus to be used and so on. In a common African situation the teachers, being salaried, have not fled with the rest but have migrated internally in the home country towards the cities. The length of time as a refugee has to be considered when planning and so must the question of how the return home will be managed one day. Problems include how to make the learning done as a refugee valid for the future. Certificates of study received in exile are not always accepted at home.
There is also the phenomenon of refugee "pull" or the refugee opportunity. Students studying in exile usually have better prospects of getting scholarships than those who stayed at home. This will make them very reluctant to return home. The best students in Uganda were Rwandan and Sudanese refugees. My best students in Sudan were Ugandan refugees! (Of course these are the achievers and have left many by the wayside.)
Education of the marginalized. The poor, older girls, and children who have to work all fall into this group. Providing alternative means for them to learn without damaging their livelihood, for instance, is a major challenge. Two very significant populations are street boys and house-girls, usually exploited, often used sexually by the boys and the father of the house, who have no access to knowledge about opportunities, let alone time or permission to go to school. They are prime victims of AIDS also.
Education when the system is collapsing. The state may be failing and there are no funds. Normally education is the most expensive part of the national budget. Corruption has entered the examination system. You have to bribe to get your child into a school which passes exams better than others (by whatever dubious means). These are characteristics across Africa. The only good education is in the hands of the churches or mosques. Totally failed states include Somalia and Liberia. Rapid urbanization is also a problem. Often, as in Khartoum, the state cannot and will not recognize the huge new populations in its midst. So a city of 4 million or more (more than half Christian) had only 17 official secondary schools a few years ago.
Educating youth and adolescents. Youth may become criminal, child soldiers or they may decide as, astonishingly, the majority still do, to make an honest living for themselves. For this to happen they must see an alternative and better future through learning, or at least through getting the next certificate. However, they may not want to sit with little children in class again. They need their own centres. Youth are vocal, full of energy. They could go either way. They have often found solutions for themselves, but they are confused between a desire to follow the barely lucrative formal route and to follow a skills-based route as a radio mechanic or in some part of the informal sector where they sense that they have fallen out of the mainstream. Society must also help in recognising that these alternatives are respectable.
A place to be, a place to get a certificate, and maybe, a place to learn. Providing education is a complex matter. It may, in the beginning, be a matter of simply providing a place to be, a place to go to for the morning at least. The first school bell in a refugee camp has a magical effect on the whole camp; as the children stream towards the school, a step has been taken towards some sort of normality, to some sort of acceptance that "we have a future again." A local school for the youngest children, held, like in Zambia, in a church or even a bar, relieves the mothers or aunties, so they can try to earn some money to feed their numerous wards, orphans of AIDS. Here the teachers are child-minders more than anything, but these groups can, and are, the basis for whole school systems for the deprived. These child-minders can be trained to be more, much more, in systems like the Zedukit, in Zambia (based on the Teacher's Friend which I wrote for totally untrained teachers Southern Sudan), where on-the-job training and a kit of school items bring the young volunteer, a drop-out himself maybe, up to some kind of professional standard.
For the adolescents a place to be may be more like a drop-in resource centre. Ideally these will provide the kind of courses that are needed, from language (maybe we are in a new country), to small business skills, to catch-up courses so that for those for whom it is suitable, there can be a return to formal education (even if the learner is now older than normal).
Choices. There are choices to be made by planners and donors. Here is one based on the old quantity /quality dilemma. Do we provide a complete channel for the best to succeed so that society will have its doctors, engineers and so on? Or do we (like is happening for Southern Sudan), more or less ignore the older students in order to guarantee that as many children as possible go to primary school? Remember: to train a single medical student for a year costs more than running a whole primary school in a Sudanese refugee camp.

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A Zimbabwe Report
Dale Otto
[Dale Otto, TEA 1C, Chavakali SS, Maragoli, Kenya, is retired from 27 years on the faculty of Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington. He and his wife Elizabeth (painter and print-maker) now live in Salem, Oregon, where he currently teaches part-time. He is also working as a volunteer consultant to the Universite Lumiere de Bujumbura, a new university in Burundi. He and Elizabeth hope to go to Bujumbura later this year. ]
January 2003, my third trip to Zimbabwe. Elizabeth and I first landed in Harare in August, 1996. We were met by a careful but fast driver from Africa University, where I was to teach and help with program development for the 1996-97 academic year.
Things were good in Zimbabwe in 1996. Robert Mugabe had been president since Zimbabwe attained its "independence" from Britain in 1980. Thanks to post-independence expansion of education, the national literacy rate was above 70%, the agriculture-based economy was strong, gasoline was cheap, and one U.S. dollar bought 15 Zimbabwe dollars. Africa University was five years old and already had 320 students. I taught in the new Faculty of Education (curriculum, research methods, student teaching supervision) and helped with program development in the new intensive ESL program. Africa University's intent is to have students and faculty from all Sub-Saharan African countries. That year, we had students from Mozambique, Angola, Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Sierra Leone and Ghana. The intensive ESL program provides English language instruction and learning for students from countries where a European language other than English is used. Each day Elizabeth and I would ride the university bus from Mutare, where our apartment was located, to the university campus, 15 kilometers outside of town. She would do watercolor studies and paintings of the magnificent scenery, of farm workers in the fields, of people idle, engaged, working. Later she taught drawing to a small group of interested students. She and her work thrived in this country of rich history and great promise. We traveled in-country, worked, enjoyed friends and soaked up some of the life differences between ourselves and other Africans we came to know.
In 1997, national presidential elections were held. For the first time, President Mugabe faced significant opposition. His response was to intimidate that opposition and any voters who he perceived may have been against him. He was returned to office in what was widely condemned as a rigged election; supplies of gasoline began to be erratic, agriculture suffered from a drought, and one US. dollar bought 30 Zimbabwe dollars.
Africa University is a wonderful idea. Education is of foundation value in any society - especially so in the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa which have been propelled through slavery, colonization, cultural disruption and the replacement of somewhat fluid ethnic groups and tribes by rigid, politically-based nations. Higher education for young diverse Africans who are on one campus, living together in a fairly egalitarian context, is a fine, important ideal. I wanted to continue to be involved, so after Elizabeth and I completed our post-retirement settling in Salem, Oregon, I returned for an additional semester of work at Africa University in January, 2000.
Again I was met by a university driver who on the way to Mutare described an unsettled, divided country and an increasingly difficult economy. The university had grown to nearly 800 students and had added new Faculties of Business Administration and Humanities to augment the initial Faculties of Theology, Agriculture and Education. It was again a deep pleasure to work at an institution where, despite stumbles and stresses, the energy was devoted to providing higher education for young African students.
But this time, parliamentary elections were coming in March and the ruling ZANU-PF party faced well-organized, strong opposition. The Mugabe government ratcheted up violence and intimidation against anyone seen to be with the opposition. Perhaps the most ruinous tactic to try to deflect public opinion away from the government's rather miserable record and performance was to initiate a program of forcible land resettlement. Since the early 1900's, the best farmland had been in the hands of white Rhodesian/Zimbabweans whose families had gained great wealth from the good soils, friendly climate, abundant and cheap labor, and governmental tolerance for a two-tiered society and national economy in which most whites profited and most indigenous blacks scrimped to get by. Neither the 4,000 white commercial farm families nor the Mugabe government had adequately addressed the lingering colonial issue of indigenous, landless subsistence farmers living by the side of (ex-)colonial whites who continued a colonial life-style. The government depended on the revenue supplied by the commercial farms, but was increasingly seen as complicit in this grossly unfair system and corrupted by it.
Thus the opposition party flourished. The Mugabe government began to forcibly remove whites from farms and resettle indigenous blacks on them, usually in small, subsistence-level plots. This, plus aggressive intimidation against the opposition, gave the ZANU-PF party a bare majority in the Zimbabwe parliament in elections again widely condemned as rigged.
By June 2000, it took 70 Zimbabwe dollars to buy one U.S. dollar, and lines formed at all urban gasoline stations. For me (and for Elizabeth, who joined me at Africa University for our last month there), travel was unpredictable, some foods were harder to find, and social stresses were palpable.
But Africa University doggedly plugs on, so again in January of this year, I returned for another semester of teaching and development work. I entered Zimbabwe via the new but nearly-deserted Harare airport terminal which had just been completed to handle the numbers of tourists who had been predicted to visit Zimbabwe. I made my own way to the university, which despite the problems of the country had grown to an enrollment of around 1,100 students, all of whom had access to a fine new library building and some of whom have occasional access to the internet. This time I lived in a flat in a men's residence hall on campus. It turned out to be a rather monk-like life -- simple cooking (really simple), simple entertainment (reading, corresponding, and being outdoors in both day and night to absorb the enveloping beauty of the land, the skies, the wonderful plants . . .), and many encounters with students and families who also live and work on campus. It was a strange, very split experience for me to be so drawn to the ordinary and natural side of Zimbabwe - and yet to see every day the continuing consequences of the Mugabe government's heavy moves to cling to power. In January, one U.S. dollar bought 1,500 Zimbabwe dollars; now, U.S.$1 will buy around 5,000 Zimbabwe dollars. It is not difficult to imagine the consequences of such an economy on those who don't have U.S. dollars. Virtually all necessities are available only through the black (or now "parallel") market; there simply isn't gasoline on the regular market, and parallel market prices are extraordinarily high; unemployment is over 70% and climbing; fewer than 200 white commercial farmers cling precariously to their farms, and they too will likely live and work elsewhere soon. Nearly all commercial farming has stopped, and the indigenous subsistence farmers who are on the once-commercial farms lack equipment, seeds, fertilizer and other necessary inputs to even manage subsistence farming.
In seven years, a problematic but promising country with a thriving economy has faltered and decayed to being a problem-riddled country with an economy in collapse - virtually all due to national leadership which is clinging to power at all costs. I have no idea if I'll be able to again live and work at Africa University. Most Zimbabweans have no idea if they will be able just to live.

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Message from the Chair of the Steering Committee
Brooks Goddard
Greetings from the back room of 59 Otis. I hope that your holiday season was as joyful as possible and that you are looking forward with eagerness to joy in the new year. TEAA is going forward with memories of a very successful Kampala 03 and some specific allocation of grants to worthy recipients. As I look to the future, I see 4 issues before us.
  1. Expansion of our Active Base: We have lists from DC01 (the 130 who attended and the 25 who had planned to attend but did not), from K03 (the 37 who attended and the 20 or so who at one time planned to attend). The current Steering committee is drawn from the K03 list. I would hope that we could entice many of you not on any list to write in and declare, "what do you want me to do?"

  2. Expansion of Activities: I refer metaphorically to two trains running on parallel tracks. One is headed toward an East African destination, a reunion or direct personal involvement; the second is headed to some domestic, USA destination which seeks to enlarge whatever local, pro-East Africa cause which might be generated.

  3. Concentrating our Funds: Should the philosophy of TEAA grants (we have a modest $15,000 bank account) be to support a variety of enterprises and schools OR should we select 2-4 schools in East Africa to support?

  4. Dar 05: Frank Ballance has made overtures with several UK TEArs to build a bridge between the two TEA sources by having a short conference and gathering in the UK before going to Dar es Salaam for a conference and school visitation program of the kind that was so successful in K03. The reason to begin in Dar is that K03 short-changed Tanzania. Such a reunion could finish in Kenya or Uganda depending on the planners. 05 was indirectly birthed by Lee Smith who named the Kampala03 brochure, calling it TEAA's "second biennial conference." I conclude by repeating advice given me: you do not retire "from"; you retire "to." And those of us who have been "back" found a warm reception and something that suggests that in this regard you can go home again. Check the website, write, telephone, email. We all wait to hear from you.

    Asante na salaamu,
    Brooks Goddard
Click here to send email to Brooks.
Click here for rest of steering comm.

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On Sending Books to East Africa
Of course, all such schemes are problematic, but there is one easy option for us all. It is called an "M-bag," and you can get one at your local post office. For full information go to the following website (click to get there): http://www.usps.com/global/mbags.htm
Here is the drill. Select books/printed matter you wish to send to EA and wrap them well in corrugated boxes of such sizes as 12 x 15 x 10" high. This size is only one example, but don't make the boxes too big or heavy. I wrapped the contents of each box in a plastic garbage bag before putting them in the boxes; I labeled each box.
Remembering that the maximum weight is 66 pounds (including the canvas M bag), take the boxes to your local post office ready to go into the M bag canvas sack. You will have to complete the address and sender labels, the PO will take the sack, and hopefully the books will arrive in 3 months. The cost is $1.00 per pound, $11.00 minimum.

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TEAA, What You Can Do Today ...
Have that ole feeling to see the fever trees at 4 p.m., taste a Tusker in Taita, see big sky in Tanzania, dance to Congolese rock n roll? We have had two very successful reunions, DC 01 and Kampala 03. There's talk of Dar 05. Another path is to do your own thing. Here are several examples. As the folks at Nike proclaim, Just do it! Apropos of this, here are comments the experiences of Dorothy and Miles Paul, Pat Gill, and Julia and Anne Dickinson.

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EA Experiences of ...
Dorothy and Miles Paul
2B, Morogoro, TZ
July 21, 2002: It is sunrise at 30,000 ft over northeast Africa; we are on the KLM flight from Amsterdam to Dar es Salaam, with a stop at Kilimanjaro airport, our destination. I am standing at the back, near the galley, trying to stay out of the way of scurrying flight attendants, because I can't bear to return to my cramped seat a moment earlier than necessary to be served breakfast. An attractive African woman joins me. After a few noncommittal words, we start talking. She is on her way home to Dar and has been traveling as long as we, having started the day before from Wichita, where her youngest son is a student at Kansas State University. After having taught school for some years, Martha Mvungi worked in the Tanzanian Ministry of Education. She found the Ministry work unsatisfying ? unsatisfactory and frustrating: too much bureaucracy, nothing accomplished for the schools and children of Tanzania. She left to start a service organization that was to provide assistance and materials to individual schools where teachers had initiative but no resources. Martha spearheaded the grass roots founding and continuing growth of an entirely new co-ed school in Dar (named ESACS Academy), to eventually span pre-school through sixth form, but so far includes only through second form. Teachers have to not only be "good," but also believe that making learning fun is the best way to teach. The school has had no financial support, or even encouragement, from the Ministry, but has been "accredited." Besides apparently preparing their students very successfully for their exams, graduates have gone on to Mzumbe, which is now the premier secondary school in Tanzania (see below) and other top Tanzanian secondary schools. Extra attention is given to music, art, drama, reading, and language. Besides English and Swahili, students start learning some French in grade 5 or 6. When I told Martha that Miles had taught at Mzumbe (of course, she knew about the T.E.A. program) and that he, and maybe I, might consider returning to do some volunteer teaching some time a few years down the road, she was eager for us to visit E.S.A.C.S. Academy before we left the country. Since we were to have a free day in Dar prior to our return to Canada, she offered to pick us up at our hotel and take us to visit the school.
August 9: Seven-forty am: we are in Martha's truck, heading north out of central Dar. In half an hour, we pull into an enclave of what look like (and used to be) small, private houses, now the buildings of E.S.A.C.S. Academy. We are just in time to be ushered, as honored guests, onto the low porch of one of the houses as the full school assembly begins in the packed dirt yard, with rows of benches on two sides occupied by spirited, but well-behaved kids. We could write a chapter about the assembly ? skits, poetry, music, and even some demonstrations of scientific principles. Its spirit, and that of the teachers and school as a whole, reminded me of my (sort-of Rudolf Steiner) elementary school in rural Pennsylvania. When I told Martha about my school's motto, "We learn with joy," she said "that's also ours"; clearly true. Afterward, Martha introduced us to some of the teachers and staff and took us on a tour of the facilities. The curriculum director, Glen Diaz, and Miles recognized each other from Makerere, 1962-3! Sue, the principal, an American-Tanzanian, has been in E.A. since 1965. Her Tanzanian husband, Victor, is writing a book on Masai astronomical myths and legends. We saw a few of the classrooms, the computer room (students are introduced to computers in elementary grades, and by 8th grade are "word processing" all their essays, having learned to touch type). The computer "fundi," who keeps what computer equipment the school has operating, volunteers his time, as does the professional musician who runs the school's music classes. Martha then drove us the short distance to the secondary school with the first floor completed and housing the first and second forms, the second floor being built, and a third floor projected for the future. They have enough land at the site for both primary and secondary schools and will eventually move the primary school to the same site. The parents and teachers have now been able to purchase enough bricks, and the construction will be completed as funds permit. The library at the elementary school was the one part of this extraordinarily dynamic, delightful school that was disheartening, because of the paucity of books other than text books. This is a major concern, and Martha would welcome donations of any books appropriate for any level. Also, instructional CDs ? atlases, encyclopedias, etc. would be welcome. [The internet is difficult, unreliable, and way too expensive to be a useful resource in the schools. We on K03 also found that schools did not have funds to connect to the internet.]
Anyone interested in volunteer teaching or assisting at ESACS school should contact Martha, who will arrange all the paper work which would take about 6 months. She said visas would not be a problem and that they would expect to provide housing near the school for any volunteers. The contact information is: Martha Mvungi, ESACS Academy, Box 35024, Dar-es-Salaam

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Pat Gill
3A, Kampala, Uganda
In 2000 I went to Uganda with a project called Bega Kwa Bega (shoulder to shoulder) that was started by an Ugandan living in the USA. There were 22 of us on this trip, and the projects were varied. David Ssagala, our Ugandan coordinator, made the contacts with the local community, found a place for us to stay, arranged transportation, and identified the projects to be accomplished. The major projects were building water tanks in homes, giving workshops on homeopathic medicine for farm animals, providing discussion on grieving for nurses, and for elementary school teacher classes on teaching content and methods.
In May 2003, prior to Kampala 03, I went to Entebbe. There classes in elementary schools number 50-100. Uganda has had universal primary education for over 10 years, with Kenya and Tanzania beginning in 2003. Uganda's and Kenya's teaching language is English, with Tanzania using Swahili. Often there are no books; the teaching is by recitation. As part of each class in 2003 I provided resource books and handouts to help teachers design ways to teach reading, English, math and science. The teachers came voluntarily during their vacation. After discussing some of the ideas with them I provided materials to make finger puppets, posters, and flash cards.I also had each teacher list 2-3 books that they would like to have to help them with their classes. I had funds to buy books, so each teacher went away with about $10 of books of their choice. Classes each day were 4 hours long, providing time for making of classroom materials.
I brought most of what I needed and planned on buying books, paper and special things in Kampala. Special care is taken to see that the books are of value to the schools. Science, number books for elementary, and reference books have provided the best value for limited weight allowance. Do they really want you? Yes, they do. In one case we had 100 teachers in three classrooms with 5 of us teaching. Other classes ranged from 10-30 teachers. At the end of each day we asked them what they wanted in the way of content for the next day. Because school was in session we worked from 1-5 pm each day so had the am to plan.They came back for four days and seemed to really have a good time. The school principals supported classes and in many cases they attended some of the sessions. One of my previous students helped me with the largest class. In one case I received a letter from one of my colleagues from the 60's thanking me for coming back to Uganda. His wife was in the class. Secondary schools differ from primary schools. In one case I just talked to the class and had them write questions on paper to have me answer.These were not planned classes. In another school I was asked to describe the careers in math and science since these subjects are hard and many students do not elect to sit them for exams.In one case I did a combination of science demonstrations and discussions on a variety of topics. In a small private school I just talked to the faculty and gave out some of the supplies I brought with me. The biggest hit of all the supplies was the National Geographic maps on which history, geography, science, and astronomy were all well represented. If you save these maps and are not going to EA, I would love to take more back. Libraries were burned during the Amin time, so there are few or no reference books. David had a program where volunteers built water tanks at homes where they were raising many orphans. Clinics are held in villages once a month and provide worming for children, treat minor illnesses and help with training the community on health issues.
Once you have decided what you can do, where you are going, and make connections with a local school or individual, there are many other problems. Where are you going to stay? Who will be your contact? How will transportation be arranged? Who is making contacts and do they really want you to come? Many contacts really want just money. Just sending money is not a good option.
How are we going to solve the problems I addressed? If where you decide to go is near a big city, you can usually find a clean, safe African hotel that is reasonable and can use the local restaurants for meals. If you are going to be in the country (where I like to be) there are some African hotels that provide clean, safe, and comfortable rooms for $30-40 a day with full board. In major cities there are large grocery stores where you can purchase some non-perishable food for your lunch. Most of the houses that we used in the 60's are now for local teachers and they have extended families with no room for another person. I stayed at Banana Village, a hotel with running water (actually from a tank that is at the top of the hill and filled with water from Lake Victoria). Great staff, VCR in the community room. This hotel is over a mile away from the Entebbe-Kampala road and within walking distance of one elementary school.Taxis (mini buses) are available at the main road, and boda-bodas [bicycle taxis] are available to take you the last mile if you feel safe on them. Private taxis from Kampala are expensive. Arrangements can be made with local schools, churches, or Bega Kwa Bega Ugandan coordinator David Ssagala (begakwabega99@hotmail.com.) During our trip in 2003 we found a number of African hotels of similar description. You need to be clear about what you are willing to pay, what kind of accommodations we are willing to accept, and how far it is to travel to your school or destination. There are also retreat houses for churches that could provide accommodations and meals. An Anglican Church retreat house where we ate in Kenya was great.
One of the issues we need to be very sensitive about is the teachers' concern about their jobs and their fear that we might be saying that they are not prepared. Preparation for rote memory in their content area is not a problem. However, science with hands on activities in both elementary and secondary school is not strong due to equipment problems. Building equipment, repairing current equipment, and maintaining facilities all are options for volunteers to help. Every country is different. TEAA individuals have many talents. You know when people are working hard that just providing a sympathetic ear will help morale. If you want to discuss what I have done and plan on doing, do feel free to e-mail me, . If you want to go back, GO! Just don't put any preconceived ideas on success or outline what you want to do. Be flexible and plan on adjusting your expectations.

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Julia Dickinson, daughter of
Ann Russell Dickinson, 1C, Mwanza, Tanzania
Ann currently lives in Minnesota; Julia is at college at Notre Dame and volunteered at a school in Jinja for June & July, 2003. Julia shares some of her journal entries:
June 4. Last night I sat awake in my bed thinking about what I could write to tell you about this place. I have my own room and companions in the night: a cricket, the gecko, and the ants and mosquitoes. I drift off into sleep eventually, but the morning comes early with the barking of dogs, the crowing of the roosters and the Muslim call to prayer screamed over a loudspeaker in a language I can't understand at 5:30 AM. Our security guard is armed with—no kidding—a bow and arrows. Things move very slowly here. It is my fourth day and I have not done a bit of work. There is no pressure. At first I really thought I was rouging it with my tin roof and simple meals, but I have realized very quickly I am very lucky. It is quite unusual that a house would have indoor plumbing like we do. Here you do not see an enormous gap between the rich and the poor. There is just poor. They are poor, but they are so friendly and are the most polite people I have ever met. Starting next week I will spend my Mondays visiting people home bound from AIDS, Tuesday-Thursday I will be teaching third graders English and science, and on Friday I will be working a the high school. Home seems very far away, but Jinja is beautiful and fascinating. It is very peaceful and so far I feel completely safe.
June17. Last Monday I went on a run with the HIV mobile clinic to check on vulnerable or orphaned children who needed assistance with school fees and I got one hell of an education. We were so deep in the village that the usual chorus of "Mzungu, bye!" from the children had been replaced by total awe. I developed a following of over 30 kids in no time. Once we stopped for a few moments a few of these kids ran off excited. When they came back they had with them a little albino boy. They were showing me to him. It is possible that they thought I was also an albino, or maybe they wanted this unique child to see someone who looked like him. Our skin was close to the same color, but his was covered with red sores. His belly was bloated out and he had some kind of mold on his head. He didn't react to me, or anything at all. It was tragic. All these kids had huge stomachs. I am certain some of them won't make it. I can't believe we live in a world where children starve to death. I wouldn't have believed it until I saw it. Lakeview Secondary School might possibly have the best choir I've heard in my entire life. Listening to these boys and girls, all with their hair shaved short to protect from lice, belt it out about death and sorrow and life and hope in this tiny classroom —that was one of the moments that made everything boring and lonely about this summer worth it. Africa itself is gorgeous. Last weekend I got to go the west to the mountains and it was just like the Africa I had pictured in my mind. I even pulled off a mini safari where our taxi driver had to speed away from elephants. My life here is not bad; it's just different. I still feel really safe. The Congo war and the trouble in the north of Uganda, while brutal, are not a threat to us here.
July 4. Nobody said it would be easy, but I guess I wasn't quite prepared to be so weak. Last weekend I really thought I had swallowed my pride after I was publicly ripped apart for taking a picture of some kids watching a play. But then, just two days later, I lost control of my primary class and sat by helplessly as another teacher came in and beat all 25 of my students with a ruler. I watched my students cry as they were punished for my failure as a teacher. I went to work the next day, admitted to the headmistress that it would help to have the teacher that was supposed to be in the room really be there to keep control, and told her about the beatings (which are both illegal and against school rules). I had puked that pride right up and swallowed it again. I came here expecting, or maybe just hoping, that I would be some sort of angel, but the absence of personal space and technology such as deodorant makes it impossible to escape humanity here - my own or anyone else's. There are few things to distract me, so I have come to accept that the waiting, the discomfort and the confusion are just a part of life. When everyone around bears it with patience and a smile, it passes by simply. I'm learning to let go of my American expectations. In reality, these inconveniences are nothing compared to the tragedies that people face. Still, somehow, joy appears in unexpected places; resolution just takes its own sweet time. After hours and hours on the worst road in the world, listening to the same J-Lo tape 7 times, 200 high school students pour out of the bus for what most admit will be their only chance to see the caves and mountains of their beautiful country. We have to run though a waterfall in our path, and the 16 year-old whose hand I'm holding and I laugh and scream. For approximately 10 seconds everything that separates us is washed away. When I'm sure whatever I am waiting for will never come - it does. When I think I can't possibly eat what's on the plate in front of me - I do. I eventually always figure out what someone is trying to tell me, or I just pretend, and I've even learned to deal with the scary scary toilets. And when I go to sleep positive that the world is over, the sun rises the next day with absolutely no concern over what some spoiled girl had told it the night before.
July 10. I don't believe that Africa should be regarded simply as an object of romanticism for soul searching white people. In reality it's just a place, filled with people, pretty much like you and me, trying to survive. Despite that, I can't help feeling that maybe there is something here. More than the wild animals or red sunsets I saw on TV-there's something in the wind. The breeze that comes off the Nile scatters papers in my classroom, makes waves in my mosquito net, bends banana trees, and has become a part of my breath. Now that we've settled the discipline issue my teaching has improved greatly and my little kids rocked their exams. Somehow the funny looking teacher with the weird accent managed to teach 27 pupils in the size of a dorm double, without books, what chlorophyll is. It was a much-needed boost to my teaching self-esteem. My life here does not simply consist of work. I've actually made a few friends. I'm not just talking about the older white sisters or my partner, who while they are amazing people, are safe and few in number. I have been lucky enough to become close with the young women who are preparing to become sisters themselves. They have to deal with crazy Americans all the time so they don't see me as a freak. But unlike most of the older American women they come in contact with, I desperately want to be a part of their culture. They've taught me how to eat sugar cane, speak some of the language, and even convinced me to plait my hair. Everyone here tells me I look "smart" in braids, but I think I look pretty funny since the colors don't match at all and it feels uncomfortable most of the time. But I am in love with the ritual they have of applying oil to sooth the scalp. It reminds me of getting checked for lice as a kid, or how monkeys groom each other. I have a hard time trusting anybody here because so many people are just trying to get something out of me, but for anyone who picks at the dry skin on my head for 30 minutes, I decided that there must be some sort of true bond. It was these friends' reassurance that pulled me out of my slump, and I will miss them when I go.Today I learned the Luganda word for goodbye—mwelaba. I'm sure I will use a lot in the next week. Monday will be the last time I get to blow bubbles with Emmanuel, the 8-year-old boy dying of AIDS that I go to visit with the mobile clinic. Parting with all my little hellions wont be easy either. And all the sisters, they've been like…well, sisters to me.I hope I gave you a fair picture of Africa. There are a million amazing stories I won't ever find words to tell, and a thousands pictures I didn't take. I can't tell you now what impact Uganda has had on me. I think I will come to that realization over the duration of my life. I know I wouldn't trade any experience I've had, including the challenges, for anything.
July 20. I'm home — safe, sound, and completely exhausted. I know that I felt sad to leave when I was finally getting adjusted and when my teaching skills were actually developing. What's amazing to me that I gave till it hurt, and I still ended up getting more than I ever offered. On my very last day at school we had a celebration and the kids gave me the best parting gift in the world—they taught me how to dance. Bare feet, dust flying, nuns playing the drums, grass skirts, hips shaking, hot sun, loud screeching, everyone laughing at the white girl who actually got the hang of it; that I will never forget. I'm proud of myself for not staying stuck in the sense of wonder and avoiding the real challenges and I'm proud of myself for not giving up when it got hard. All the stuff I was really scared of never happened. I didn't get sick once (still solid baby), I didn't get anything stolen, and I actually felt very safe the whole time. All my problems came from within the tangles of my own mind. This leads me to believe that we all shouldn't be as scared of Africa as we are. Peace, Julia
Ann writes: Paul and I visited Kenya in 1998 and then discovered an AIDS orphanage which I visited last June. This orphanage is called Nyumbani and is run by a Father Angelo D'Agostino, Father Dag. Father Dag is an energetic surgeon/psychiatrist in his late 70's whose long and interesting career includes heading the Jesuit refugee services in Africa. You can find out more about him and the orphanage at www.nyumbani.org. The number of AIDS orphans housed in Nyumbani has doubled since '98, and they now have an outreach program that reaches 700 AIDS orphans who live at home with relatives. Nyumbani welcomes anyone who wants to visit, and they have a great gift shop where a few of us TEAAers dropped quite a bit of money, all for a good cause, of course. The TEAAers who got to visit the orphanage and even those who weren't able to come might enjoy the website. Here is a recent newsletter from Nyumbani: We now have 92 children at Nyumbani and thanks to God, we have had no deaths for the past 15 months.12 children went to perform during the launch of a community initiative to fight HIV/AIDS by Kenya's First Lady, Her Excellency Lucy Kibaki. In her remarks, Mrs. Kibaki noted she has known me since the inception of Nyumbani and promised she would work to support the home. You may remember that last Christmas Eve, just three days before his election, President Kibaki invited the children to his residence. Mrs. Kibaki extended an invitation for this coming Christmas, but this time at State House! Our wonderful singing group, "Watoto wa Mungu," together with their musical director, singer Don Rawzi, remained Number One in the pop music charts for six weeks and at the time of writing has only slipped to Number 10 after ten weeks in the charts.... Which brings me to my usual appeal: (1) More stamps, albums etc for the Nyumbani Stamp Club, (2) Clothing for boys and girls over 13 years, (3) Shoe repair kits, (4) Kitchen aprons, (5) Overcoats, jackets and sturdy boots for security staff. So, as we begin planning for the season of goodwill, let me leave you with an old Jewish proverb: To save the life of one person is to save the whole world. May God bless you for all your help and support. Angelo D'Agostino, SJ MD, Founder & Medical Director [All the above submissions have been edited by Brooks Goddard]

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Fundraising for Your Favorite Cause
Gene and Arlone Child
I'd like to let you all know about Arlone's project of providing some scholarships for MacKay college [in Uganda]. We were very impressed with Gertrude Ssekabira at MacKay. We have been in touch with her by email several times since our return. Arlone dreamed up this idea of offering an African dinner to people we know in the area for a $25 contribution. We pulled it off and collected about $700 that will be forwarded to Uganda for scholarships. Others of you might wish to dream up your own projects. -Gene
And this from Arlone. First, I planned two menus for two dinners. I ended up doing both for one dinner. It was a lot of work, but everyone seemed satisfied. Menu #1:Samosas, curried chicken w/rice, chutney, toppings of nuts, raisins, pineapple, coconut, papaya, and tomatoes Menu #2: Roast chicken w/peanut sauce, irio (potatoes, beans, corn & spinach), sweet potato pie
And this from Arlone. First, I planned two menus for two dinners. I ended up doing both for one dinner. It was a lot of work, but everyone seemed satisfied. Menu #1:Samosas, curried chicken w/rice, chutney, toppings of nuts, raisins, pineapple, coconut, papaya, and tomatoes Menu #2: Roast chicken w/peanut sauce, irio (potatoes, beans, corn & spinach), sweet potato pie
And this from Arlone. First, I planned two menus for two dinners. I ended up doing both for one dinner. It was a lot of work, but everyone seemed satisfied. Menu #1:Samosas, curried chicken w/rice, chutney, toppings of nuts, raisins, pineapple, coconut, papaya, and tomatoes Menu #2: Roast chicken w/peanut sauce, irio (potatoes, beans, corn & spinach), sweet potato pie
And this from Arlone. First, I planned two menus for two dinners. I ended up doing both for one dinner. It was a lot of work, but everyone seemed satisfied. Menu #1:Samosas, curried chicken w/rice, chutney, toppings of nuts, raisins, pineapple, coconut, papaya, and tomatoes Menu #2: Roast chicken w/peanut sauce, irio (potatoes, beans, corn & spinach), sweet potato pie
Our daughter helped make the samosas. Gene grilled the chicken. I made the curry and pie the day before. The only problem, too many leftovers. The amazing thing was that people who couldn't attend sent me money anyway. When you're raising money for a specific purpose many people respond generously. [The TEAA treasurer reports that he has received over $2000 from the Childs and their friends. The money will be transfered to MacKay School in Uganda for scholarships and to meet other school needs.]

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Grants
Patricia Gill, grants committee chair
Interest in working with schools in East Africa and with people who have demonstrated special talents to us during the 2003 trip has been the main focus of grant requests. TEAA members have initiated their own money raising talents, talked to educators in the country about needs, and written small grants, as well as initiated discussions regarding future help.
Of special interest are the grants contributed to and requested by Arlone and Gene Childs. They are working with Mackay College, Nateete, Uganda, to assist bright students to continue their studies.
Brooks Goddard has worked with Dr. Gordon McGregor to purchase 50 copies of his book, English for Life, for secondary schools in Uganda. Fawn Cousens helped in this project, and, to the best of my knowledge, there was a special reception to deliver the books to some identified schools. Many went to the secondary schools where a TEA person taught.
Boxes of books have been sent to secondary schools in Tanzania and Uganda. However, we cannot confirm that the books sent by US mail have been reaching the intended recipient. We will continue to monitor this project and give you more information in a future newsletter. As many of our TEAA members are retiring and cleaning out their offices do keep in mind the need for books, and other educational material for EA schools with the hope that in 2005 we can continue our progress. Ask yourself if sending or contacting a person going in 2005 is worth the expense of the books.
Two members of our 2003 group are going back to Uganda this year. I [Patricia Gill] am going to Uganda in late February and taking the maximum of two suitcases, 70 pounds each, with school supplies to work with elementary and secondary schools in Uganda. Henry Hamburger is going in June to do advance work on future projects that could be set up with TEAA. Henry would like suggestions as to individuals or schools that you would recommend he contact. Please let him know, either by phone - 301-320-4350 - or click here to email him at henryh@cs.gmu.edu No TEAA funds support these trips. Other individuals have also expressed an interest in going on their own. If this might be of interest to you, call Pat, and she can tell you how much it is costing and maybe give you some contacts.
Grant application forms, which are short, are available on the web site. If you have any ideas for grants please call Pat Gill (904) 461-3950 after April 10 or e-mail her with the ideas. Members of the grants committee would be glad to help you in any way to complete the forms. We have criteria and a process to allocate the small amount of resources we have. Some of our members are seeking grant resources to add to our existing projects, so if you want to work on this effort, let Pat know.

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Pass Through Grants
Sharon Lybeck Hartmann
I have called my accountant about pass-throughs. She says the area is somewhat gray. However, she tells me the following: (1) the ceiling amount which triggers the necessity to file an income tax return for a 501(c)(3) is money gathered in excess of $25,000 in a single year. (2) A targeted grant made on a pass-through can NEVER be given to a named individual.
No American citizen may deduct a contribution to a foreign charitable organization UNLESS control of the funds has been surrendered to an American charitable organization (like one with 501(c)(3) status.) When that is done, the deduction is claimed as having been made to the organization. While the donor may suggest or designate an entity to which the person would like the funds contributed, final control of the funds and the contribution must be in the American 501(c)(3). The donor must release the funds to the 501(c)(3) organization. To pass-through such a contribution, the proposed contribution must be within the mission statement and resemble other grants made by the 501(c)(3), and it would be wise to have the project approved by the board or committee which deals with charitable contributions before the donation is accepted. The 501(c)(3) must document its decision to make the grant. Any contribution/grant in excess of $250 must be documented in a letter to the donor.

[ Sharon Lybeck Hartmann is a member of the TEAA grants committee. To send her email about pass-through grants or other TEAA matters, click here: sllybeck@comcast.net ]

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Dar in '05: Preliminary Planning Meetings
Frank Ballance
[On a November trip to London, DC01 organizer Frank Ballance had meetings with Jonne Robinson and Michael Twaddle to discuss some possibilities for a one-day conference in London in May of 05 before going on to a reunion trip in East Africa that will emphasize Tanzania before going on to the other two East African countries. Jonne's notes from the meeting can be found on the TEAA webpage: http://cs.gmu.edu/~henryh/TEAA/d05/alive.html. -Ed]
Jonne (Jonatha) Robinson and I met on Saturday (November 8th) and talked over various ideas for combining a visit to London with an East African focus on Tanzania in 2005. Jonne wrote up her notes afterwards, and I have edited and added a bit. This is good summary of our discussion, thanks to Jonne.
Then on Monday, November 10th, I found Michael Twaddle (TEA, Mbale 62-64) at the Institute for Commonwealth Studies, conveniently located on Russell Square and near the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London. We had lunch and talked over ideas for a possible conference in London on UK-US cooperation in the formation and administration of TEA. There are many aspects of this subject that would be of academic, developmental, and personal interest.
Michael had also been thinking of involving the Commonwealth Centre in hosting a symposium/conference on the subject. There are excellent facilities at the Institute for Commonwealth Studies for a TEA gathering. Michael will look at a possible available date for a May 2005 meeting (end of academic year, and thus a good time for such a meeting). There are housing facilities nearby, so the facilities and expertise are there, and we hope available, for a conference prior to departing for East Africa.
A working group could assist Michael in organizing the event. We would want to cover US and UK perspectives on TEA: its impact, accomplishments, and legacy, and what was learned from this joint endeavor. Also an afternoon session could explore secondary education in East Africa today, educational needs, and what volunteers could do. Several organizations in London may want to participate, such as the Commonwealth Centre, SOAS, the East African High Commissioners, Ministry of Education, etc.
I assume that the flights from London to East Africa usually depart in the evening, so that TEA participants could have the day after the conference in London, and leave that evening for EA. These details can be worked out after agreement on dates and basics.
(Contact info: Jonne Robinson , Michael Twaddle , Frank Ballance )

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Books, Articles, Websites, and Films on PBS
My local librarian had seen positive reviews and recommended Sarah Erdman's NINE HILLS TO NAMBONKAHA, TWO YEARS IN THE HEART OF AN AFRICAN VILLAGE (2003). Erdman chronicles her experiences as a rural health worker with the Peace Corps in Cote d'Ivoire in the late 1990s. Interesting and entertaining. -Ed Schmidt
I had a visitor from England who had taught with me at Lady Irene College in Ndejji, Uganda. She brought me a book which I have read and now I'm going to give it to the Waldorf College Library, in Forest City, Iowa. It is called THE SHADOW OF THE SUN, MY AFRICAN LIFE (2001) by Polish writer Ryszard Kapuscinski. He has really offbeat experiences in Africa. It was very interesting. My spellcheck doesn't like his name! Waldorf has a satellite campus in Dar es Salaam and has a large population of foreign students (most from Africa) on the Iowa campus. Betty Coxson [An excerpt can be found at: http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/2001-05-07-the-shadow-of-the-sun.htm -Ed]
Very popular right now are books in the series of short detective novel by Alexander McCall Smith featuring detective Precious Ramotswe, owner of the Botswana's only detective agency. Titles in the series: THE NO. 1 LADIES' DETECTIVE AGENCY, TEARS OF THE GIRAFFE, MORALITY FOR BEAUTIFUL GIRLS,and THE KALAHARI TYPING SCHOOL FOR MEN. You will most likely find these books catalogued under McCall Smith, even though the author's name is not hyphenated on the book jackets. -Ed Schmidt
I just finished reading a book that one of you must have recommended to me, and I pass along that praise. The book is AN AFRICAN SEASON (Simon & Schuster, 1967) by Leonard Leavitt. The book documents the author's experiences teaching in a small southern Tanzanian town near Mbeya. Read, you must needs read. It brought back some of my own memories as did parts of Julia Dickinson's reflections. -Brooks Goddard
The October 2002 Scientific American contains an article entitled "Computers for the Third World" which describes the "Simputer," a handheld device designed for rural villages. The article details the intended uses, the cost, and the advantages and shortcomings of this simple computer. -Gene Child
I was very impressed by Steven Lewis' words (concerning the African AIDS pandemic) and think you might be as well. http://allafrica.com/stories/200401090717.html -Brooks
I have just spent 6 glorious weeks in Uganda in December and half of January 2004. I am now in Cape Town, South Africa enjoying the sights, people, and food. I spent the day yesterday with Margaret Legum, the widow of Colin Legum whom we all read during our Africa days. She has written a really thought provoking book called, IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE LIKE THIS: a new economy for South Africa and the World. I have often met Margaret on the consultancy trail in Africa as she consults in Diversity Management including race and gender. Do give her book a read. Regards to all, Gloria Lindsey Alibaruho, .
There are going to be 3 African film shows in February on WGBH in Boston, and they may also be on your local public radio station. They are Tales of Ordinary People, Faat Kine, and Daresalam. I have seen only Faat Kine, and I recommend it very highly. Directed by Ousman Sembene, it is the story of a middle age Dakar woman, single and a businesswoman, reflecting on her life. -Brooks

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Sad News
Tony Beck (1B) wrote on October 22 to report the shooting deaths of Dick Eyeington, 62, and his wife Enid, 61 and a nurse, at their flat on their school compound in the self-declared Republic of Somaliland. Tony noted that Dick had been his replacement as geography teacher at Mzumbe School, Morogoro, Tanzania.
The Eyeingtons spent 32 years teaching in Swaziland where Dick was headmaster at Waterford Kamhlaba, a multiracial boarding school. They came out of retirement to take the position in Somaliland when they feared the school in Sheikh, some 550 miles north of the Somalian capital, Mogadishu, would close for good without their help. They reopened the school last January with 100 students.
Somaliland broke away from Somalia during the 1991 civil war, and conditions there have generally been much more peaceful than in the rest of the country. However, in recent months, hostilities toward Westerners have increased due to the Iraq war according to aid workers.
In both Swaziland and Somaliland the Eyeingtons worked for the Austrian-based SOS Kinderdorf International, also known as SOS Children's Villages. In his email, Tony said he was hoping to contact other Mzumbe-ites who knew the Eyeingtons in an effort to make some sort of collective response, perhaps money to the school where they were working or the SOS school in Swaziland. Tony has not corresponded since October, but to follow up with him, his contact information is: Tony Beck, White Meadows, Kentisbury Ford, Barnstaple, North Devon, EX31 4ND UK. Tel: 011-44-1271-883-305, [The above article includes information from two articles in the October 22 edition of The Guardian.]

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Obituaries
Burt Caplan (TEEA2) [from Joel & Eva Reuben]. Just a note to inform you of the death of Burt Caplan (TEEA2) who was posted to Mwanza TTC in Tanzania. Burt was a respected teacher and principal in the Spring Valley/Rockland County NY area and taught African history courses. He loved his two years in Tanzania and our friendship started back in 1966 while training at Columbia. Our children became friendly and we all settled in Palm Beach County after our retirement. We will miss Burt, who was a credit to his profession and an outstanding TEEA tutor.
Elizabeth (Betty Erisman) Psychas [from George Psychas]. Just a note to let you know that Elizabeth (Betty Erisman)Psychas, who taught at Rosary College 1962-64, passed away on July 2, 2003. She is survived by her husband George Psychas, Butima TTC and Marangu and Chongombwe, Dar es Salaam. She leaves two children, Paul, now a Medical Doctor serving in the Peace Corps, based in Accra, Ghana and Ellen, former UN Staffer, serving in East Timor, Bosnia and Tajikistan. [Elizabeth and George Psychas met while they were both teaching in Tanzania. -Ed]
Tom Cantieri. [from Emilee Hines Cantieri] Nov. 23, 2003. My husband Tom Cantieri died this afternoon of a massive heart attack. He was driving a van, helping our daughter move, and slumped over the wheel. Fortunately, he had just pulled out of the parking lot into the driveway, not in heavy traffic. Emergency personnel worked faithfully and took him to the hospital but he never regained consciousness.
Tom never wanted to go to Africa or a lot of other places I went, but he always took care of things at home so I could go, and was there to welcome me home. [Tom attended the DC-01 reunion. -Ed]

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News
Betty (Bowe) Castor (3C) is running for the US Senate in Florida. You can check out the campaign website by clicking on... http://www.bettycastorforsenate.com. Any chance of a TEAAers for Betty group -- so many of you now live in Florida?
Mabel Lee (TEEA1) sent a page from her church's newsletter describing her Sept 13 departure for Malawi to serve as a missionary with IFRESH (International Foundation for Education and Self-Help) http://ifesh.org/.
Emilee Hines Cantieri (1-A, Machakos TC): My latest book, More Than Petticoats: Remarkable Virginia Women, was published in Sept. 03 by Globe Pequot and is available at $10.95 on Amazon.com. Subjects (all born before 1900) include Pocahontas, Martha Washington, Dolly Madison, religious leader Elizabeth Russell, travel writer and early Am. activist Anne Royall, actress & acting First Lady Priscilla Cooper Tyler, Civil War spies Belle Boyd & Elizabeth van Lew, Lady Astor, Harlem Renaissance poet Anne Spencer, African American philanthropist & banker Maggie Walker, Edith Bolling Wilson, writer Ellen Glasgow and union activist Lucy Randolph Mason.

I'm still sending around my memoir, East African Odyssey and humorous novel, Burnt Station.
Ray Gold. Hi Ed, Judith Lindfors has urged me to let you know about the current status of my manuscript on the Teachers for East Africa Project (TEA). The title of the manuscript it still A Teaching Safari; the subtitle is A Study of American Teachers in East Africa. I recently learned that PublishAmerica has accepted it for publication and that it will be published sometime in 2004. I shall inform you of its publication date as soon as I can.

I should point out that the manuscript covers the period 1961 to the middle of 1965, when research on TEA ended. For this reason, it is almost entirely about TEA and has very little to say about the Teacher Education in East Africa Project (TEEA), other than to account for how it originated. When you inform recipients of the TEAA Newsletter about A Teaching Safari, it might be well to indicate that it is essentially about American teachers in TEA.

I read with great interest and much envy about the reunion in East Africa last June and managed to add a postscript about it to my manuscript. My wife, Alice, and I had decided some time ago that we were simply not physically capable of doing long trips any more. Her stroke last spring certainly kept us from changing our minds. Alice has largely recovered from the stroke, happy to note. Its major, continuing effect is a sharp dip in her energy level. Otherwise, her mind is still sharp, and she is able to do most of what she wants to do when she wants to do it.

I am keeping myself busy starting work on a mountain of interview data I gathered over a period of about thirty years on the pastoral role of the clergy in Montana, a topic which will likely interest many sociologists, ministers, and parishioners (including some TEAAers, I reckon). I hope to be able to produce a publishable manuscript from this material in two years or so if I manage to maintain good health and work discipline.

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Your Letters and Comments Newsletter #9
Dear Ed, Your newsletters bring an extra ray of sunshine. With each issue I relive my time in Uganda. I suspect my students are still teaching in schools similar to the village schools I visited in the 60s. Your secondary students, on the other hand, had opportunities that led to experiences far beyond their villages. Education was a pivotal key for their future, even Hastings'! Yoshino Hatanaka (TEEA1)
To the Editor: Your comment about science at Budo (little evidence of lab work being done) is sad because when I was there, a British colleague and I (he was also a physicist) introduced an integrated 5th form physics curriculum mixing materials (including some of the actual lab apparatus which we got donated from the mfgs. in US and UK) from the PSSC physics project then just starting in the US and an analogous UK program (name I don't recall now 40 years later), and felt we successfully pepped up the program considerably, while still preparing the students for upper level Cambridge exams. Thanks for the note, I enjoyed it, Ed. Bob Taylor
Great reports on the reunion trip. I am grateful I got to be part of it, even if only for a day. For the future, people may wish to check out World Links, an NGO that spun off from the World Bank after a developmental period of linking schools around the world. Uganda is one of the countries in which it is active, but not yet Kenya and Tanzania. You may check out this potential for directly linking US schools with Uganda schools at http://www.world-links.org/english/. Ward Heneveld
I was delighted to hear that Senteza is still alive and kicking. I had an enormous amount of respect for him. His lectures at Makerere were an inspiration and did more to unravel the mystery of "good teaching" than anything I have heard before or since----and I have taught for 40 years. Sincerely, Bob Jameson.
Dear Colleagues in education, Thank you very much for your e-mail dated 07/13/03 and the kind words about me and my colleagues at Nkumba University. Your visit had a great impact on all those educators who met you, and especially on us at Nkumba and other schools you visited. We were very much encouraged by the enthusiasm of all the TEAA and your eagerness to help. Please rest assured that the seeds you planted in East Africa during the 60-70s fell on fertile ground and will continue growing especially with the new impetus your visit has given. Let us keep in touch. W. Senteza Kajubi.

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We've Heard from You
Michael Panter (3B UK). I was in the TEA scheme from 1963 - 71. I did the training course at Makerere and was then sent to Machakos School, 40 miles east of Nairobi. I got married there in Aug 64, to Margaret, an English university friend - (it was all planned before!!) and we stayed there for two tours, i.e., nearly five years; we then returned to Kenya for a final tour at St Mary's School, Yala, near the Uganda border till April 1971.

Then I taught in Solihull, first at the boys' Grammar School for 3 years and then moved to the newly built Sixth Form College nearby. I taught Physics and later Electronics there until 1994 when I accepted the offer of early retirement! I now live with my wife near Nottingham, about 60 miles north of Birmingham, in a small house [contact info. below]. I am interested that you have a TEA Alumni group in the US; I am not sure what we would call such a group, but certainly not Alumni, as this word is not used in England! I am not aware of any such group here, but am hardly in contact with any former colleagues.

I look forward to further contact and maybe an opportunity to meet in the future.
Ted Essebaggers. Have recently hooked up with Bob Rogers in Minn, thanks to your addresses, etc. Keep up the good work. Maja and I return to Norway in Dec after three years in Namibia.
George Pollock. Sept 03. Hi Ed, Just to let you know that I have a new e-mail address, which is George.Pollock@baymeadow.com. Thanks for all you are doing for TEAA. The main news about me is that I have had both my knees replaced and am back to playing tennis four times a week. I'm running around the court like a kid. It's amazing, a whole new lease on life. Have finished my online novel (statekid.com) and am trying to decide on my next big writing project.
Carl Fritz (USAID) (excerpted from a number of emails). Dear Mr. Schmidt, I was located in Nairobi as (US)AID's Regional Activities Officer 1963-1966. I was a busy fellow, traveling around all three countries every month. I did have a lot to do with [TEA's] progress in cooperation with AID education advisors in the three countries. I can recall having some very major conferences on the subject each year that I was there. My recollection is that the first conference was held in Mombasa, at which time I talked to the British representative and the AID reps from Washington about plans for the Teacher Education project. I recall that probably the main reason the Government sent me to establish an East African regional program was to foster a regionalization of the three countries. I have feared that various things have probably caused that to fail. Idi Amin was no help. But I recall that when I was still in East Africa, a minister from Uganda visited the School for African Wildlife Management which was at Mweka in Tanzania. He seemed to think it was a good example for Uganda to follow. Its success, however, was due to the fact that it was conceived as an African--not a national institution, and thereby could obtain lots of aid from the U.S., the U.K., and other nations, and its graduates could serve as game or park officers anywhere in Africa, and the School would accept students from anywhere in Africa if qualified. In 1967-68 I became Deputy Director in Washington for AID's Eastern and Southern Africa. During that time I returned to East Africa and met Carl Manone, who was Columbia's man in charge of the project.

I was president of the NC Triangle chapter of the Society for International Development for six years in the early 1990s. On one occasion I mentioned TEA. A young man said he thought his father had benefited from that program. These things come back to make one feel good!

I happen to be on the editorial board of American Diplomacy, the online journal which can be found at www.americandiplomacy.org. I have written various short articles and book reports for that journal most of which can be found in its archives. I have written one on my experiences on East Africa, but our chief editor seems to think there are lots of priority things waiting to be posted there. Perhaps you would be doing me a favor if you went to that magazine and wrote a letter to the chief editor, saying that there are a number of you who have worked in programs in East Africa, and would be interested in seeing some items in the journal regarding economic development in East Africa. I retired from the Government in 1976, went to work with various programs in Indonesia for 10 1/2 years and with agricultural research in Bangladesh for two years before settling here in the NC Triangle in 1990. Despite being retired, however, I am interested in what goes on in the world, and like to hear about projects with which I have been affiliated. Yours sincerely, Carl
Frank E. Smith. I happened to plug in Teachers for East Africa into my browser - and came up with TEAA.... After I left Maseno, I did an Msc at McGill then a Phd at UNSW in Sydney - then taught at Universiti Sains Malaysia for 6 years, followed by 4 years at Kenyatta Univ College - then 20 years in northern Ontario - in Sudbury at Laurentian University. I have taken early retirement and now work for Cornell at their new medical college in Qatar - I would be most interested in joining your association - as I still retain great interest in eAfrica.
Bernard Sauers. One thing I might share with others interested in East Africa, is Childreach. Those who saw the movie About Schmidt (Any relation Ed?) will be familiar with Childreach. What we have done is not adopt a child , but a community development project. They have projects throughout East Africa. We have helped with a project in Mwanza, and are taking on a project in Morogorro. Each person who is interested could select a project in the community they have served, and keep the legacy alive. If interested, the contact information is: Childreach, 155 Plan Way, Warwick, R I 02886, 1-800-556-7918, .

Contents       Top

The Search
A surprisingly large number of TEAers have been contacted for the first time during the past 6 months. With the possibility of an 05 reunion that includes meeting in the UK, I have focused my attention on UK TEAers. Most of those in the list below are UK TEAers who have been found by distributing lists from waves 1 through 4 and through searching for those with uncommon names on google.com. Google searches and personal contacts are the only way to search at this time. We do not have the lists of colleges and universities attended like the lists that TC Columbia published for US TEA and TEEA. Also, TEA UK went on until 1969, the last year of TEEA, and we do not even have names from 1964 onward. The google searches are very much a hit-or-miss undertaking. My search for Ian Denman is a case in point. Several "hits" with his name also mentioned a horse named Rafiki -- I must be on the trail of the correct Ian Denman! My email to the only available email address got the following response:
Habari Ed! I am President of the Australian Capital Territory Showjumping Club. Ian Denman is a member of the club. His name appears on our website quite frequently because he often places in events on his horse, Rafiki. Ian did indeed teach in Kenya and so is probably the person you wish to contact. His e-mail address is denmen@netspeed.com.au. Coincidentally, I was born at Nakuru and lived in Kenya until December 1962. I went to school at The Nakuru School and then at St Marys School in Nairobi. My parents owned a farm at Mau Narok. I (would like to) draw your attention to this website - http://www.fungasafari.com/ What were you doing in Kenya? Kwa heri, Peter Dingwall [The website is worth a look. -Ed]
We desperately need one or more of you in the UK to carry on the search for the UK TEAers. Let me know if you are interested and/or willing! [To reach Ed, click here: eschmidt1@mindspring.com]
On the US side, two long-sought members have been located. Don Martin phoned from Asheville, North Carolina, to report that he exchanges annual letters with Neil Albright (TEEA2), who lives in Australia. Neil's address is given in the list below. Hal Strom was located at his school in Vladivostok, Russia by a google search. Incidentally, when searching for someone on google, results may vary considerably depending on whether or not you include the middle initial. My advice, try it both ways.